Pacific ESI - PAM-SHOCK-HVI

PAM-SHOCK-HVI

PAM-SHOCK HVI is a nonlinear Finite Element software package which is used to simulate shock transmission and subsequent transmission responses within materials.

High Velocity Impact (HVI) simulation is used to analyze the dynamic behavior of material under very high speed impacts.

What you gain with PAM-SHOCK HVI:

Finite Element Formulation - Addresses laws of shock waves propagation within various environments. Specific Formulation - Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) Material Database - PAM-SHOCK HVI offers a wide range of materials to calibrate behavior under various impact conditions (fusion, composites deformation...)

PAM-SHOCK HVI capabilities address several fields of application:

Aerospace

High Velocity Impact (HVI) simulation is used to analyze the dynamic behavior of material under very high speed impacts. This typically finds applications in aerospace where we need to understand the damage suffered by spacecraft encountering space debris such as micrometeoroids.

Aircraft

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Through HICAS, a European R&D project, PAM-SHOCK has been used to develop design methodologies and simulate the high velocity impact response of composite aircraft structures. This is urgently required by the aircraft industry as impacts from bird strikes or foreign objects on an aircraft parts can be a serious jeopardy.

Defense

Among the several applications of PAM-SHOCK HVI, one deals with fluid-structure interactions, which feature any kind of explosion. This calls for complex simulation, which for instance enabled ESI Group to retrace a scenario for the Lockerby Boeing 747 attack.

PAM-SHOCK HVI can simulate High-Frequency Vibration Responses, which occur when any part has undergone a short duration pulse, such as the explosion used for the separation of modules in spacecraft or rockets.

Biomechanics

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PAM-SHOCK HVI also simulates structure/biomechanics interaction under high load impacts. Various applications in the field of the soldier's protection can be addressed.

Ballistic impacts on protective equipment such as helmet, vest, boots can be simulated to investigate consequent injuries.

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